A Mallet’s finger is an injury to the tendon at the tip of your finger that is common among baseball players. You may not fully straighten your finger, and it may droop at the tip. Splinting and freezing are common treatments. Surgery is highly uncommon. You should seek treatment for a mallet finger as soon as possible.

What are Mallet Finger splints?

Mallet Finger Splints is a malformation in which the end joint of the fingertip bends downward and cannot be straightened. Tendons connect the forearm muscles to the phalanx (finger bones), allowing finger movement. The fingers can straighten thanks to the tendons positioned on the back of the hand. Flexor tendons, which are found on the palmar surface, allow the fingers to bend. When the extensor tendon that connects to the distal phalanx (fingertip bone) is injured, the fingertip loses its capacity to straighten independently.

Mallet’s finger is a common sports injury that occurs when you try to catch a hard ball and it hits your outstretched fingertip. Damage to a finger on your dominant hand is common (your dominant hand).

How joint is a mallet finger splint?

Mallet’s finger is a relatively frequent condition, particularly among athletes. It can also happen while doing domestic chores if you hit the tip of your finger on an immovable object like a door or wall.

Who is at risk of a mallet finger splint?

This injury is most common in baseball players but can occur in anyone who participates in a sport that utilizes hard balls (basketball, volleyball, football, etc.). In fact, even doing something as easy as changing the bed might result in a mallet finger injury.

What causes Mallet Finger splints?

Because it is a common fastball injury, Mallet Finger is also known as Baseball Finger. While this deformity is commonly observed in athletes, it can also result from crush injuries, jammed fingers, or even a knife wound. The consequence is the same whether the extensor tendon is cut or the bone at the location of tendon attachment is broken. Mallet Finger can be caused by any acute injury to the fingertip.

What are the symptoms of Mallet Finger splints?

At the time of injury, the distinctive finger deformity will be visible. Without physical aid, the distal phalanx will not straighten. Depending on whether the bone is fractured, there will be varying degrees of pain, swelling, discoloration, and tenderness.

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If Mallet Finger is suspected, get medical assistance within a week following the accident.

What is the treatment for Mallet Finger splints?

Non-surgical

If there are no significant bone fractures, most cases of Mallet Finger can be treated without surgery. When the tendon heals, a customized finger splint may align the digit appropriately. The splint is worn constantly for 6 – 8 weeks, followed by 2 weeks at night. Surgery may be necessary if the finger does not respond to splinting.

Surgical

Mallet Finger accompanied by major fractures or joint damage may necessitate surgery. The surgeon will repair any fractures with microscopic pins, wires, or screws, allowing the bone to heal. The joint may be fused straight under challenging situations. Depending on the amount of damage, the tendon may be repaired using stitches or grafts. Mallet Finger accompanied by major fractures or joint damage may necessitate surgery. The surgeon will repair any fractures with microscopic pins, wires, or screws, allowing the bone to heal. The joint may be fused straight under challenging situations. Depending on the amount of damage, the tendon may be repaired using stitches or grafts.

Can the mallet finger be fixed?

Healing requires both immediate and long-term care.

If you are harmed, you must immediately:

  • Wrap a towel around an ice pack and place it on your finger.
  • Place your index finger above your heart. This can help to minimize swelling and pain.
  • If necessary, use over-the-counter pain relievers.

Long-term treatment entails placing your fingertip in a splint and maintaining it for at least six weeks while your tendon heals. Suppose a portion of bone is ripped off. In that case, your healthcare provider may order another X-ray after a week or two of splinting to ensure that the bone fragment is in the proper position and that the healing process is proceeding normally. You’ll have to wear your splint all day and night for at least six weeks.

The splint may be carefully removed to allow for cleaning of the splint and the finger, but you should avoid intense activities and sports to avoid recurring injuries.

What are the complications of the treatment of mallet finger splints?

Most difficulties are caused by insufficient therapy that immobilizes your finger correctly. In rare cases, despite adequate treatment, the tendon fails to mend. Solid instability surgery (fusion) of the ends of two bones can offer healing and stability with practically normal function in these instances.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Can Mallet Finger heal on its own?

In less severe cases, especially when the tendon is not entirely severed within the finger, a mallet finger may heal itself with rest and care. However, this is not recommended because the finger tendons are very delicate. With medical intervention, even something as simple as a splint, the likelihood of the injury healing entirely or correctly is much higher.

What are the symptoms of a mallet finger splints?

Mallet Finger is a disorder that manifests in an evident and distinct form, so if you have it, you will be aware of it from the beginning. Other illnesses that affect the joints of the fingers, such as boutonniere and swan’s neck deformity, may mimic mallet fingers in their early stages. Still, once the distinguishing aspects of each condition become clear, you and your doctor will know which you have.